H Day the First


At WIS we use an 8-day rotational schedule for classes, organized A-H days. I see my students in their electives five of eight days per cycle. So here at the end of the first cycle- our H Day- I have seen each of my classes for 5+ hours of instruction and homework. Yes, there has been homework in the first few days of school.

In the Computer, Programming, Systems and Robotics course we have:

  • completed our technical set-up of the course blog and student blogs200140902 If I Were a Robot Exercise
  • we have engaged in thinking routines about computers, programs, systems and robotics
  • we have been introduced to and begun to establish our classroom culture through entry/exit tickets and the workflow of information between class, the course blog, the student blogs and the google shared folders
  • we have begun our personal glossaries defining the terms used in class on the student blogs
  • we have engaged in a class discussion examining “what is a computer?” and “why do we use computers?”
  • we have engaged in a class discussion examining “what is a program?” and begun some basic programming exercises
  • we have begun an exploration of systems and their relationship to programs in lay terms
  • we have begun a deeper exploration of elegant programming using the thinking routines “I used to think and now I think” and “What makes you say that?”
  • we have practiced each class the art of self documentation of our learning through artifacts and visual notetaking with photography and screenshots of our work

In the Photography and Film course we have:

  • completed our technical set-up of the course blog and student blogs
  • we have engaged in thinking routines about why humans create images and imagery20140901 In Class Photography Observations-0113
  • we have been introduced to and begun to establish our classroom culture through entry/exit tickets and the workflow of information between class, the course blog, the student blogs and the google shared folders
  • we engaged in the thinking routine “See, Think, Wonder” about the one of the first photographs ever taken and began our practice of slow looking in observation
  • we began, through experience, to use the workflow we’ve chosen for synchronizing our images across devices
  • we have begun our investigation of the relationship between story and image/ intention and outcome as both image creator and image consumer
  • we have practiced each class the art of self documentation of our learning through artifacts and visual notetaking with photography

As the first cycle ends here on a Thursday of our second week I find that I am pleased with the thinking routines used so far and the dispositions I have attempted to cultivate. My teacher mind is moving forward like a tractor, tilling the land ahead and being fertilized with an infusion of project zero ideas. In order to make these concepts my own I know that I as a kinesthetic learner must do them in order to fully absorb them.

Labor Day Monday I was cleaning my kitchen and listening to a re-play of the Diane Rehm show on NPR. I love her voice and the deliberate stillness in incites in me when I listen. When I listen it is the thing I am doing. I did not know what she looked like until I searched just now for a link to include in this post so I had no visual for this clear, calm and well paced conversationalist. At some point in the show I found myself hyper tuned-in when the conversation included a guest on the show reading a passage from the Grapes of Wrath with a very clear and engrossing description of a turtle crossing the road. I have a love affair with turtles and it was this, not the discussion of Steinbeck alone that caught my attention. Standing in my sun filled kitchen on the cheap decades old parquet floor I found myself still, a cat encircling my legs and I listened. I listened. I envisioned. I wondered.

At the end of the reading I immediately made a note to myself to use this- a reading of great description- with my students in the Photography and Film class as part of our exploration of images/imagery and its reciprocal relationship to story as the spine of human communication. A variation of the see, think, wonder- I found a riff that I’ll try next cycle. Listen, envision, wonder.

 

 

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